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Brian Schottenheimer works with the Bulldog quarterbacks during Thursday's rainy practice.

ATHENS—On Thursday afternoon, the Bulldogs practiced in jerseys and shorts in chilly, rainy weather in temperatures nearly 30 degrees cooler than their initial spring practice two days ago. From what the media observed, the unfriendly conditions apparently hindered the Georgia offense to some degree, and head coach Mark Richt agreed.

With new offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer overseeing the drills, the Bulldog offensive unit first had its issues with the quarterback-wide out ball exchange on a series of wide receiver reverse-type plays. With a rain-soaked ball not doing the offense any favors, next, the quarterbacks and tight ends had a difficult time connecting on passing routes, missing on five consecutive pass attempts at one point.

The offense’s struggles prompted Richt to turn his attention from the field to the sideline, where the media stood including several cameras, and say, “I hope y’all videoed that! It’ll give [opposing teams] a lot of confidence when they play us!”

On the defensive side of the ball, the weather evidently had no effect. “In fact, defensively, we love this weather,” said linebacker Lorenzo Carter. “It creates more turnovers, and that’s what we really try to do under [defensive coordinator Jeremy Pruitt].”

Working on “getting the basics down again”—footwork and technique—defensive lineman Josh Dawson was somewhat in agreement with his teammate regarding the weather conditions. “I kind of like the heat [more so than the rain], so when I place my hands [on the field], they’re not sliding everywhere,” Dawson said. “But, it wasn’t too cold out there.”

Carter said the entire team “ended practice on a high note” despite the offense’s earlier struggles. “We had a lot of energy, even when conditioning at the end, we were ready for more—fourth quarter and then some.”

Notably, starting his day by watching film on his own beginning at 6 a.m., the high-energy Carter seemingly had been ready before the “fourth quarter”—and then some.

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