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Statement from the Autonomy 5 Conferences on today’s Senate Commerce Committee hearing about NIL Legislation

Georgia head coach Kirby Smart during a press conference at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga., on Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. (Photo by Tony Walsh)

The SEC has issued the following joint statement with the Atlantic Coast, Big Ten, Big 12 and Pac 12 conferences related to today’s Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Name, Image and Likeness legislation:

 

The Autonomy Five Conferences thank Chair Maria Cantwell and Ranking Member Roger Wicker for today’s hearing and their determination to set a fair and enforceable national standard on NIL. Only Congress can pass a national solution for student-athlete NIL rights. The patchwork of state laws that begins on July 1 will disadvantage student-athletes in some states and create an unworkable system for others. As leaders in college athletics, we support extending NIL rights in a way that supports the educational opportunities of all student-athletes, including collegians in Olympic sports who comprised 80% of Team USA at the Rio games. We continue to work with Congress to develop a solution for NIL and expand opportunities.

SEC To Allow Immediate Eligibility for Intraconference Transfers

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama (June 3, 2021) – The Southeastern Conference announced it will allow immediate eligibility for intraconference transfers following a vote today by the SEC’s Presidents and Chancellors.

 

The change in policy, which takes effect immediately, will better align with NCAA legislation adopted in April 2021 that established a universal one-time transfer opportunity applicable to student-athletes across all sports.

 

As a result of the SEC’s new policy, student-athletes who transfer directly within the Conference will no longer be required to serve an automatic year in residence at their new school before being eligible for competition.

 

“This is an important measure to further support student-athletes throughout the Southeastern Conference,” said SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey. “While maintaining the expectation that coaches and others avoid improper recruiting, this change will ensure that student-athletes who enroll at an SEC member institution will enjoy the flexibility afforded to other student-athletes across the nation.”

 

In order to gain immediate eligibility, a student-athlete will need to declare his or her intent to transfer by February 1 for Fall sports, May 1 for Winter sports and July 1 for Spring sports.  NCAA rules include similar deadlines except the NCAA deadline for Fall sports is May 1.

 

“The SEC has established a deadline for declaring an intention to transfer in Fall sports as February 1 in order to create time windows that are more consistent across Fall, Winter and Spring sports,” Sankey said.

 

In other action, the SEC Presidents and Chancellors approved the following proposals:

 

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives – To encourage, facilitate and assist member institutions in attracting and hiring historically underrepresented minorities in the leadership of their athletics departments, particularly in the roles of athletics director, head coach, and senior woman administrator (SWA) and in positions that typically lead to employment in the positions of athletics director, head coach, and SWA. (Establishes SEC Bylaw 23)

 

Restriction Against Participating in Distribution of Conference Funds due to Postseason Ban in Basketball or Football – To clarify and simplify an existing bylaw to specify that an institution receiving a postseason ban in basketball or football from the NCAA or the Conference shall be limited to only 50% of the Conference’s revenue distribution derived from postseason revenue in the affected sport. Further, to establish that if the institution receives a second postseason ban in either basketball or football during the ensuing five-year period that the institution shall forfeit 100% of the Conference’s revenue distribution derived from postseason revenue in the affected sport during the period of the ban.  (Amends SEC Bylaw 31.26)

 

Extended Training Trips During Christmas Break – Sports other than Football, Basketball, and Women’s Rowing – To eliminate the Conference prohibition on extended training trips during an institution’s Christmas holiday break in sports other than football, basketball, and women’s rowing.  (Amends SEC Bylaw 17.1.9)

 

Nontraditional Courses from Another Institution – To specify that a current student-athlete may not use more than nine semester hours of nontraditional course work from another institution within an academic year to fulfill academic progress eligibility requirements.  (Amends SEC Bylaw 14.4.10)

 

Two-Year Eligibility – To eliminate all provisions of the two-year eligibility rule. (Eliminates SEC Bylaw 14.1.15)

 

Two-Year College Transfers – Nonqualifiers – To specify that a nonqualifier who initially enrolls at a two-year college prior to transferring to a member institution (i.e., 2-4 transfer) who does not meet Conference transfer requirements may be eligible for practice and athletically related financial aid, but may not be eligible for competition, during the individual’s initial academic year in residence. (Amends SEC Bylaw 14.5.4.2)

 

Four-Year College Transfers – Nonqualifiers – To specify that a nonqualifier who initially enrolls at another four-year institution prior to transferring to a member institution (i.e., 4-4 transfer) who does not meet Conference transfer requirements may be eligible for practice and athletically related financial aid, but may not be eligible for competition, during the individual’s initial academic year in residence. (Amends SEC Bylaw 14.5.5.6)

CBS Sports 2021 College Football Broadcast Schedule Announced

All Games to be Broadcast on the CBS Television Network and Streamed on Paramount+

 

SEC ON CBS Schedule Kicks Off Sept. 18 with Rematch of Last Year’s SEC Championship Between Alabama and Florida

 

All Three Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy Games to Air on CBS, Starting with Air Force-Navy on 20th Anniversary of 9/11 and Concluding with Army-Navy on Dec. 11

 

CBS Sports has announced its 2021 college football broadcast schedule and windows, which presents a total of 21 games, including five doubleheaders and features college football’s highest-rated television package, the SEC ON CBS.

 

Coverage will be available to viewers across the country on the CBS Television Network and will stream live on Paramount+.

 

The 2021 SEC ON CBS schedule totals 15 games, including the SEC Championship on Saturday, Dec. 4 (4:00 PM, ET).

 

This year’s SEC ON CBS schedule begins on Sept. 18 with a rematch of last season’s epic SEC Championship between defending National Champion Alabama and Florida.

 

The annual rivalry game between Georgia and Florida will take place on Oct. 30.

 

In addition to the traditional Saturday SEC ON CBS Game of the Week at its familiar 3:30 PM, ET time slot, there will be a primetime SEC doubleheader on Oct. 9 and an afternoon SEC doubleheader the following weekend on Oct. 16. SEC ON CBS games are announced six-to-12 days prior to their broadcast date.

 

CBS Sports’ college football schedule kicks off on Sept. 11 at 3:30 PM, ET with Air Force facing Navy on the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. This season, all three Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy games will be broadcast on CBS, with Army vs. Air Force from Globe Life Field in Arlington, Texas on Nov. 6 (11:30 AM, ET) and the annual ArmyNavy classic from MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. on Dec. 11 (3:00 PM, ET).

 

This year’s CBS Sports college football schedule features a total of five doubleheaders. In addition to the two SEC ON CBS doubleheaders (Oct. 9 and Oct. 16), there will be doubleheaders on Saturday, Sept. 25Saturday, Nov. 6 and Friday, Nov. 27. On Sept. 25, the action will begin with a Mountain West showdown between Boise State and Utah State (Noon, ET) followed by the SEC ON CBS Game of the Week (3:30 PM, ET). On Nov. 6Army will face Air Force in the early game (11:30 AM, ET) followed by the SEC ON CBS Game of the Week (3:30 PM, ET). And on the Friday after Thanksgiving (Nov. 27), it will be a Mountain West matchup between Boise State and San Diego State (Noon, ET) along with an SEC rivalry game as Missouri visits Arkansas (3:30 PM, ET).

 

CBS’ 2021 college football schedule concludes with the Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl on Friday, Dec. 31.

 

Brad Nessler and Gary Danielson, along with reporter Jamie Erdahl, are CBS Sports’ lead college football announce team. Gene Steratore is the rules analyst.

 

COLLEGE FOOTBALL TODAY, the Network’s pre-game, halftime and post-game studio show, returns with host Adam Zucker alongside analysts Rick Neuheisel and Brian Jones 

 

CBS Sports Digital will also provide additional college football coverage throughout the season on a variety of platforms, including CBSSports.com, the CBS Sports app, and CBS Sports HQ, the 24/7 streaming sports news service.

 

Following is CBS Sports’ 2021 college football schedule, including SEC ON CBS games and broadcast windows:

 

DATE TIME (ET) GAME
Saturday, Sept. 11 3:30 PM AIR FORCE at NAVY
Saturday, Sept. 18 3:30 PM ALABAMA at FLORIDA
Saturday, Sept. 25 12:00 NOON BOISE STATE at UTAH STATE
3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Oct. 2 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Oct. 9 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME TBD
8:00 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday Oct. 16 12:00 NOON SEC ON CBS GAME TBD
3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Oct. 23 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Oct. 30 3:30 PM GEORGIA vs. FLORIDA
 
Saturday, Nov. 6 11:30 AM ARMY vs. AIR FORCE
3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
 
Saturday, Nov. 13 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Nov. 20 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Friday, Nov. 26 12:00 NOON BOISE STATE at SAN DIEGO STATE
3:30 PM MISSOURI at ARKANSAS
Saturday, Nov. 27 3:30 PM SEC ON CBS GAME OF THE WEEK
Saturday, Dec. 4 4:00 PM SEC CHAMPIONSHIP
Saturday, Dec. 11 3:00 PM ARMY – NAVY
Friday, Dec. 31 12:30 PM TONY THE TIGER SUN BOWL

A Campbell Trophy® Q&A with Matt Stinchcomb

College Football Hall of Famer and Georgia legend now heads a commercial insurance brokerage and consulting firm.

An exceedingly well-rounded individual with a near flawless 3.96 GPA, Matt Stinchcomb remains one of the most decorated players in Georgia history. With his 2018 induction, Stinchcomb became the third College Football Hall of Fame inductee to have also claimed the Campbell Trophy®. On the field, Stinchcomb twice earned First-Team All-America honors at offensive tackle, including consensus laurels in 1998. In the classroom, he twice claimed Academic All-America honors, including being named the Academic All-American of the Year in 1998. His academic record and community leadership brought multiple honors, including an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, an NCAA Top Eight Award and twice being named to the AFCA National Good Works Team.
After graduating magna cum laude with a business degree, Stinchcomb was selected 18th overall by the Oakland Raiders in the 1999 NFL Draft. The Lilburn, Georgia, native played five seasons for the franchise and added three more with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Following the NFL, Stinchcomb joined with his brother, Jon, and former teammate, David Greene, both NFF National Scholar-Athletes from Georgia, to form the Stinchcomb Family Foundation and the Countdown to Kickoff Charities, which focuses on raising money for children’s healthcare. He currently serves as a partner at Sterling Seacrest Partners, a commercial insurance brokerage and consulting firm. During the college football season, Stinchcomb can be seen as a game analyst on the SEC Network. Follow Matt on Twitter and/or LinkedIn.
What does being a Campbell Trophy® winner mean to you?
School was the No. 1 priority in our house growing up. Most adults in our family were educators, teachers or principals, so it’s no surprise. But, the reasoning was that, if you can have success academically then you can have access to the broadest menu of options; and, if you can achieve at a high level then you should achieve at a high level. To have that recognized in conjunction with athletics is special for me.
You are one of only three former Campbell Trophy® recipients to have also been inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame. As someone who has achieved at the highest level in academics and athletics, what advice would you give to the next generation who would like to follow in your footsteps?
Time is your most valuable resource and hard work is undefeated. If it requires your time, then it’s worth your best effort. If you’ve given that, then you always win.
Your younger brother Jon was also named an NFF National Scholar-Athlete. Were you two competitive growing up? If so, how do you think that helped you both become so successful on and off the field?
Yes, but not in football or the classroom really. It was more in the driveway playing basketball or ping pong or Nintendo. Once he got bigger, I realized I really should’ve developed a jump shot.
What was the best part about playing in the SEC? Was there a particular team and/or player that you really looked forward to lining up against?
The enthusiasm for the sport at the collegiate level and around the games themselves. Football is the most popular sport in the country, but, in the SEC footprint, college football is king. Game days are amazing with the tailgating and huge hostile sold-out stadiums. And, that’s virtually every week. People ask who our biggest rival was and I could pick four- or five-different teams. But, because a lot of my high school friends and my wife went to Auburn, that game held special importance to me.
Did you have any pregame rituals (same food, music, etc.) or bizarre superstitions during your playing days?
I had two in college. In the locker room pregame, I always put on my Mountain Park Athletic Association hat. It’s where I first started playing football, loved those coaches and teammates. The other was I always wore a black wristband on my left arm. Chuck Mize was my head coach at Parkview High School, and he died spring of my sophomore year at Parkview. He always believed in me — long before I believed in myself. I started wearing the wristband the next season in memory of him.
You currently work for the SEC Network/ESPN. What drew you to the broadcasting industry? As a former player, what’s the hardest part about watching and analyzing the games now?
Well, it’s ironic because I did not enjoy interacting with the media as a player. But, while we were still in the NFL, Jon and I had created a charitable foundation and became more involved in children’s charities. We started some events to raise funding and awareness, and to promote the events. I would do sports radio or local sports segments and was told I was pretty good at it. At first, I was surprised at how much I enjoyed doing it, but it makes sense. Broadcasting is very much a team effort, and I have great teammates. So, it’s fantastic to still get to be in that environment around the game.
Childhood sports hero?
Larry Bird, Dale Murphy, Bo Jackson.
Favorite way to relax?
Fishing.
Hobbies that may surprise people?
Pickleball.
Are you a call or a text kinda guy?
Text.
Campbell Trophy® Q&A Background:
Click here for more information on The William V. Campbell Trophy® Presented Since 1990, which recognizes the nation’s top scholar-athlete from the college gridiron. The trophy is a member of the National College Football Awards Association, which encompasses the most prestigious awards in college football.
Campbell Q&A Series:
Today’s Q&A represents the 16th in a series of Q&A sessions with former winners of the Campbell Trophy®:
Sept. 10, 2020: Sam Acho (2010, Texas)
About The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame
Founded in 1947 with early leadership from General Douglas MacArthur, legendary Army coach Earl “Red” Blaik and immortal journalist Grantland Rice, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame is a non-profit educational organization that runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in young people. With 120 chapters and 12,000 members nationwide, NFF programs include the Chick-fil-A College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, Future for Football, The William V. Campbell Trophy®, the NFF National Scholar-Athlete Class Presented by Fidelity Investments and a series of initiatives to honor the legends of the past and inspire the leaders of the future. NFF corporate partners include Delta Air Lines, Fidelity Investments, Goodyear, Jostens, the New York Athletic Club, the Pasadena Tournament of Roses and the Sports Business Journal. Follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter @NFFNetwork and learn more at footballfoundation.org.
The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame
Building Leaders Through Football & Supporting
• 768 Colleges & Universities • Over 81,000 College Football Players
• 15,810 High Schools • Over 1.04 Million High School Football Players

Record Set as Three Bulldogs Selected on Final Day of NFL Draft

Georgia defensive back Richard LeCounte (2) before the Bulldogs' game with Arkansas in Fayetteville, Ark., on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. (Photo by Kevin Snyder)
Georgia offensive lineman Trey Hill (55) during the Bulldogs’ game with Arkansas in Fayetteville, Ark., on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. (Photo by Walt Beazley)

Georgia Sports Communications

May 1, 2021

CLEVELAND – With three players selected Saturday afternoon on the final day of the 2021 NFL Draft, the University of Georgia football program set a new record for its most players chosen in the seven-round era (since 1994) with nine. The prior school record was eight players selected, previously accomplished in 2002 and 2013.

Defensive back Richard LeCounte was selected by the Cleveland Browns in the fifth round with the 169th-overall pick, followed by Trey Hill being chosen in the sixth round by the Cincinnati Bengals with the 190th-overall pick. The Georgia contingent was rounded out by defensive back Mark Webb, who was picked 241st overall by the Los Angeles Chargers.

Georgia’s nine selected players ranked second in the SEC and tied for third nationally with Notre Dame. This is the first time Georgia has ranked second among SEC schools since 2012, which was also the last time the program finished among the nation’s top three.

LeCounte, a native of Riceboro, started 33 games for the Bulldogs, earning All-SEC First Team honors despite playing in only five regular-season games. During his career, LeCounte tallied 14 takeaways, including eight interceptions, while amassing 176 tackles over four seasons. In his final start against Kentucky on Oct. 24, he notched a career-high 13 tackles, three pass breakups, and a fumble recovery, earning SEC Defensive Player of the Week and Jim Thorpe Award National Player of the Week honors. In his junior season, he picked off two passes against Baylor in the Sugar Bowl and returned an interception 71 yards against Missouri. His first career interception came as a sophomore off Alabama’s Tua Tagovailoa in the 2018 SEC Championship Game.

LeCounte is the first Bulldog to be selected by the Browns since former teammate Nick Chubb was picked 35th overall in 2018.

Hill, a native of Warner Robins, started his final 22 games at center, following a four-game stint at right guard to close the 2018 season. The 2019 All-SEC Second Team performer played 95 percent of Georgia’s offensive snaps during his eight starts this past season before missing the final two games due to injury. Hill helped preserve a touchdown drive against Tennessee on Oct. 10, recovering a third-quarter fumble 15 yards downfield from the line of scrimmage. Prior to joining the Bulldogs, Hill was a teammate of former Georgia and current Buffalo Bills quarterback Jake Fromm for two seasons at Houston County HS.

Hill is the first Georgia player to be chosen by the Bengals since safety Shawn Williams went 84th overall in 2013. Along with Williams, Cincinnati has imported multiple prominent players from Athens in recent years, including A.J. Green, Clint Boling, Geno Atkins, and Robert Geathers.

Webb, a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, appeared in 49 games over four seasons, starting 12 over his final two campaigns. Webb totaled 82 career tackles, including 46 in his junior season, ranking fifth on the team. He amassed 21 stops in his senior season and set a new career high with nine against Mississippi State on Nov. 21. He also posted his first career interception in a win over Auburn on Oct. 3, while tallying four tackles at Alabama on Oct. 10. Earlier in his career, he appeared in 13 games on special teams during the 2017 season, while converting from wide receiver to defensive back.

Webb is the second Bulldog to be selected by the Chargers in this year’s draft, following the selection of tight end Tre’ McKitty with the 97th pick Friday evening. Prior to McKitty, the Chargers had not chosen a Georgia product since Gene Washington in 1977.

Green Bay Packers Select Bulldog Eric Stokes In NFL Draft’s First Round

Georgia defensive back Eric Stokes (27) during a game against South Carolina at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia, SC., on Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020. (Photo by Tony Walsh)

Georgia Sports Communications

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Georgia defensive back Eric Stokes was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 29th overall pick in the opening round of the 2021 NFL Draft on Thursday night.

 

Stokes, a native of Covington, Ga., watched day one of the Draft with his family in his hometown.  With his pick, the Bulldogs have now had at least one player drafted in each of the last 29 years.

 

This marks the fourth consecutive year that the Bulldogs have had at least one First Round pick and seventh time in the last decade that Georgia has had a player selected in the opening round.  Stokes is the sixth Bulldog defensive player selected in the First Round since 2013.

 

Stokes is the first Bulldog selection for the Packers since defensive end Jarius Wynn went in the seventh round in 2009.  In fact, Stokes is the first Georgia player that the Packers have ever selected in the opening round.  He becomes the 17thBulldog selection for Green Bay since the Packers picked their first Bulldog (Pete Tinsley) in 1938.

 

Stokes started 25 games and played in 36 games following a redshirt season in 2017.  The 2020 AP First Team All-SEC member had a career-high four interceptions and 94 return yards in nine games last season and he was one of only four FBS players to return two of those picks for touchdowns.  Stokes finished with 78 career tackles, two tackles for loss and a forced fumble on a sack against Tennessee in 2019 that resulted in a Bulldog defensive touchdown.

 

Day two of the NFL Draft will begin at 7 p.m. ET on Friday and will feature the second and third rounds.  The last four rounds of the Draft will start on Saturday at 12 p.m.

Former College Football Coaches to Compete in the 14th Annual Peach Bowl Challenge

Georgia head coach Kirby Smart during the Bulldogs' game with Arkansas in Fayetteville, Ark., on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. (Photo by Walt Beazley)

Current and former coaches to compete for $320,000 in scholarship and charity.

  

Greensboro, Ga. (April 27, 2021) – A field of 19 current and former college football coaches is set to compete in the 14th annual Peach Bowl Challenge charity golf tournament May 3-4 at Reynolds Lake Oconee outside Atlanta. The coaches will be competing for a share of the $320,000 scholarship and charity purse.

 

This year’s field includes an impressive roster of college football greats that features four former Dodd Trophy winners, and a collective group of coaches who have won three national championships, 30 FBS conference championships and boast 2,039 career wins.

 

The nation’s premier collegiate coach golf event will feature coaches competing in teams over two days of competition. Proceeds from the event benefit charitable foundations selected by the coaches. Since its creation in 2007, the event has contributed a total of $8.4 million in scholarship and charity, helping make the Peach Bowl college football’s most charitable bowl organization.

 

“Many of these current and retired coaches have participated in our Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl and Chick-fil-A Kickoff Games. This is our chance to give back to them for what they have done to help us grow and succeed – helping us meet our mission to be the country’s most charitable bowl organization,” Peach Bowl, Inc. CEO and President Gary Stokan said. “We can’t wait to see who comes out on top, but the real winners will be the charities these great coaches are playing for.”

 

The two-day tournament will be played in Ryder Cup format with Stableford scoring and will include 18-hole Chapman Scotch on Monday, followed by an 18-hole Two Man Scramble on Tuesday. This year’s event will also feature a Skills Challenge that includes bunker shot and chipping competitions.

The current field of competitors for this year’s Peach Bowl Challenge is projected to include:

 

Current Coaches

 

COACH SCHOOL CHARITY
Shane Beamer South Carolina Herma’s Readers
Manny Diaz Miami Overtown Youth Center
Dave Doeren NC State 321 Coffee
Randy Edsall UConn Edsall Family Foundation Philanthropy Fund
Gus Malzahn UCF Angel Armies
Jeff Monken Army Mission 22
Dan Mullen Florida Mullen Family “36” Foundation
Kirby Smart Georgia The Kirby Smart Family Foundation
Dabo Swinney Clemson Dabo’s All In Team Foundation

 

 

Former Coaches (Legends)

 

COACHES FORMER FBS SCHOOL(S) CHARITY /FOUNDATION
Frank Beamer Virginia Tech Herma’s Readers
Mike Cavan SMU Cornerstone Church Athens
Chan Gailey Georgia Tech Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Jim Grobe Ohio, Wake Forest, Baylor Fisher DeBerry Foundation
Bobby Johnson Vanderbilt Sea Island Habitat for Humanity
Paul Johnson Navy, Georgia Tech Paul and Susan Johnson Family Foundation
Rick Neuheisel Colorado, Washington, UCLA Wedgewood Charity
Houston Nutt Boise State, Arkansas, Ole Miss Chickasaw Foundation
Tom O’Brien Boston College, NC State Marine Toys for Tots
Steve Spurrier Duke, Florida, South Carolina HBC Foundation

 

 

@CFAPeachBowl

 

 

About Peach Bowl, Inc.

Peach Bowl, Inc. operates the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, one of the New Year’s Six Bowls selected to host the College Football Playoff. The Bowl has earned a reputation as one of the most competitive bowls in the country, with 53 percent of its games being decided by a touchdown or less. Peach Bowl, Inc. has disbursed $292.5 million in total team payouts over its 53-year history and have drawn an all-time ESPN viewership of 280.4 million for both the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl and Chick-fil-A Kickoff Games. Peach Bowl, Inc. also leads all other bowl game organizations in charitable and scholarship contributions, having donated or committed $57.6 million to organizations in need since 2002. Peach Bowl, Inc. created and manages the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game, the Peach Bowl Challenge charity golf tournament, manages The Dodd Trophy national coach of the year award and led the relocation and financial foundation of the College Football Hall of Fame to Atlanta. For more information, visit Chick-fil-APeachBowl.com or follow us on Twitter at @CFAPeachBowl and find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/CFAPeachBowl.

QB J.T. Daniels Leads Red Team to 28-23 Win Against Black Team

Georgia quarterback JT Daniels (18) during the G-Day scrimmage on Dooley Field at Sanford Stadium in Athens, Ga., on Saturday, April 17, 2021. (Photo by Tony Walsh)

For Immediate Release
UGA Sports Communications

Georgia fans during the 2021 G-Day Game at Sanford Stadium in Athens, Ga., on Saturday, April 17, 2021. (photo by Rob Davis)

ATHENS, Ga. — Quarterback JT Daniels passed for more than 300 yards and three touchdowns to lead the Red past the Black 28-23 in Georgia’s G-Day Game on Saturday in front of 20,524 at Dooley Field at Sanford Stadium.

 

Daniels went 28-of-41 for 324 yards with touchdown passes to receivers Adonai Mitchell, Kearis Jackson, and Demetris Robertson.

 

Mitchell led all receivers with seven catches for 105 yards and the touchdown. Robertson pitched in 88 yards and his score. Tailback James Cook had 61 yards receiving and 26 yards rushing for the Red, while tailback Zamir White rushed for 28 yards and a touchdown and had 50 yards receiving.

 

Quarterback Carson Beck paced the Black by going 22-of-31 for 236 yards and two touchdowns. Tailback Kendall Milton rushed for a touchdown and 34 yards and added 31 yards receiving. Tight end Darnell Washington led the Black with 84 yards receiving and one touchdown.

 

Defensive back Javon Bullard had a Red-best seven tackles, including five solo. Defensive back Major Burns followed with six tackles. Defensive lineman Zion Logue recovered a fumble and had a sack.

 

For the Black, linebacker Quay Walker had a game-high eight tackles, followed by defensive back Ameer Speed with seven. Defensive lineman Devonte Wyatt was credited with two sacks.

 

The Black squad struck first on Saturday as Milton raced in from eight yards out. Kicker Jack Podlesny booted the PAT for a 7-0 lead with 3:22 left in the first quarter. The touchdown was set up by Washington’s 51-yard catch from Beck.

 

The Red countered with a 2-yard rushing touchdown by White with 2:43 left in the half. Kicker/punter Jake Camarda’s PAT knotted the game at 7-7.

 

Podlesny, the hero of Georgia’s win in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, broke the tie with a 35-yard field goal with 1:25 remaining.

 

Daniels connected with Mitchell on a 24-yarder as time expired in the first half, then hit Jackson on a 9-yarder with 48 seconds remaining in the third quarter. Camarda converted both extra points for the Red.

 

The Black squad made things interesting in the fourth quarter as Beck and Washington connected again, this time on a 13-yard touchdown pass. A two-point conversion failed, leaving the score at 21-16 with 2:22 remaining.

 

But Daniels answered with this third touchdown strike, finding Robertson on a 59-yard catch and run. Camarda’s PAT made it 28-16 with 1:52 left.

 

Beck capped the game by finding receiver Jaylen Johnson on a 10-yard touchdown pass with 22 seconds to go. Podlesny’s PAT accounted for the final margin.

 

Georgia will open the 2021 season on Sept. 4 in Charlotte, N.C., against Clemson. The Bulldogs’ home opener will be Sept. 11 against UAB.​

Georgia Schedules 2026-27 Games with Louisville

ATHENS — Georgia and Louisville have scheduled a home-and-home football series for 2026 and 2027 according to a joint announcement Wednesday by the two schools.

 

The Bulldogs will visit Louisville on September 19, 2026, and the Cardinals will return to Athens on September 18, 2027.  Georgia and Louisville have only met once previously—the 2014 Belk Bowl in Charlotte, a 37-14 Bulldog victory.

 

Georgia’s previously announced home-and-home series with Power 5 non-conference opponents include two with Clemson (2029 at Clemson and 2030 in Athens, and 2032 in Athens and 2033 at Clemson); Texas (2028 at Austin and 2029 in Athens); UCLA (2025 in Pasadena and 2026 in Athens); Florida State (2027 in Tallahassee and 2028 in Athens); Oklahoma (2023 in Norman and 2031 in Athens); and Ohio State (2030 in Athens and 2031 in Columbus).  The Bulldogs also have two neutral site Power 5 games in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game at Atlanta’s Mercedes Benz Stadium:  2022 vs. Oregon and 2024 vs. Clemson.

 

2021 – Clemson opener in Charlotte

2022 – Oregon in Kickoff game in Atlanta

2023 – at Oklahoma

2024 – Clemson in kickoff game in Atlanta

2025 – at UCLA

2026 – UCLA in Athens; at Louisville

2027 – at FSU; Louisville in Athens

2028 – FSU in Athens; at Texas

2029 –  at Clemson; Texas in Athens

2030 –  Clemson in Athens; Ohio State in Athens

2031 – Oklahoma in Athens; at Ohio State

2032 – Clemson in Athens

2033 –  at Clemson

Pickens Injures Right Knee in Practice

Georgia wide receiver George Pickens (1) during the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Ga., on New Year’s Day, Jan. 1, 2021. (Photo by Chamberlain Smith)

For Immediate Release

March 24, 2021

 

Statement from UGA Athletic Association:

 

George Pickens, a junior wide receiver from Hoover, AL, injured his right knee in spring football practice on a non-contact play on Tuesday afternoon. MRI confirmed an injury to his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which will require surgery. He has already started his pre-op rehabilitation program under the supervision of the UGAAA sports medicine staff and a full recovery is anticipated.

 

“The good news is that the MRI showed it to be an isolated injury with no other structures involved,” said UGA head coach Kirby Smart.  “George is a hard worker. I know he will bring the same work ethic to rehab that he shows in practice every day.”